Crochet Sock Reviews

img_0629-copy_medium2NOTE that I’m a US crocheter, so the stitches mentioned are using US terminology.

Recently, Andi from Andre Sue Knits podcast mentioned that she was interested in exploring Crochet Socks.

If you’ve been following my blog for a while, you’ve seen some crochet socks that I’ve done.  The socks photographed here are a design that I made up – as are a number of the crochet socks that I’ve made.  I still wear most of my crochet socks and have darned them when needed. When I’m looking for warm socks, I love my crochet socks!

Crochet socks have different challenges in their construction.  Crochet stitches, for example, tend to be more textural (aka bumpy) than knit stitches – and the fabric stretches in different directions. In addition, crochet fabric is traditionally thicker than knit fabric with the same yarn – so they don’t work well in tight shoes.

I don’t have particularly sensitive feet, so the bumps on the soles don’t bother me.  If you are the kind of person who feels the purl bumps in knit socks, then I’d suggest that you only try the slip stitch style of crochet socks shown above.

For me, I like the slip stitch or extended single crochet stitches on the sole of the sock, with some kind of lace on the leg and top of the foot to help with sideways stretch.  I’ve tried a few different heels, and I find that so far that the the heel flap style works the best for me.  You can see an example on the Ultimate Crocheted Socks by Dorothy Hardy.

I haven’t made crochet socks in a while – I’ve been distracted with knitting socks, but thanks to Andi’s mention of crochet socks I think I’m going to try another pair again – and see how my improved understanding of sock construction, including heel construction, helps.

If you’re interested in creating your own crochet socks, I’ve created a bundle of my crochet socks and other interesting patterns to try on Ravelry.

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Freeform for all!

Creative Every Day 2012

Creative Every Day 2012

Creative every day – March 19th, 2012

So I’ve discovered why I don’t post so much to this creative blog.  I don’t feel like I make much progress crafting in a week!

Yarncraft

I continue to work on the Ravelry Free form Crochet-A-Long for International Crochet Month.  I’m not sure that it’s going to be the bag that I originally intended .. I’m not sure what it’s going to be, but here are some updates in photos!

It seems that I can also use a bit of help on the photography .. but the fact that these photos were taken at night, inside, doesn’t help.

Other Creative fun

I cooked Tilapia for the first time ever this week .. it came out pretty good!  There may be more fish in our future!

I also did a bit of cleaning with the help of some friends and the craft room is getting closer to something that I can work in!  Now the middle is clear and most of the furniture is arranged!  There’s still a few piles to go through, but I can find my way around the walk-in closet and get stuff that I want now.

Creative Every Day and more!

Creative Every Day 2012

Creative Every Day 2012

Creative every day – March 12th, 2012

This week was a really great creative week.

Yarncraft

I got a lot of work done with the Ravelry Free form Crochet-A-Long for International Crochet Month, and so far I’m mostly pleased with the outcome.  I can’t believe how large the piece has grown already and it’s only been 12 days!

This is my first freeform and I’m thrilled with how well it’s coming out.

Dragonfly paperclip and Little Flowers yarn on a paper yarn knitted background

Flame stitch in Little Flowers and baby yarn

Other Creative fun

I’ve also been cooking at home a bit more.  Last night I made beef stock for soups and stews!  I’m not totally sure what I’m going to be using it for, but it’ll be frozen into 1/2 cup chunks once I’ve separated the fat off.

Maybe it’s time for a chili ….

Evergreen Socks for Winter

I’ve really been enjoying crocheting the Evergreen Trellis Socks by Karen Ratto-Whooley.  I received the pattern as part of her Crochet sock club.  If you crochet and are looking for a sock club, I recommend it!

I’ve done two socks from the club so far, and they’re both top down with a heal flap and gusset.  I’ve only done crochet socks with afterthought or short row heals and I am really enjoying the different construction.

For me, I find that the extended single crochet soles are not quite as comfortable as the linked double crochet that I’ve used before, so I made that adjustment.  The heal flap is still single crochet, and the gusset and sole are all double crochet.  I also have a high arch, so I lengthened the gusset by alternating decrease and non-decrease rows for the first 4 decreases.  I’m really happy with the changes and how the socks look on my foot.

The wonderful world of crochet socks

Crochet Socks in ShoesI love making socks.  There’s just something special about wearing hand made socks.

I both knit and crochet socks, but I crochet socks significantly faster than I knit them (about 3x as fast!). Crochet socks are faster for me because the stitches are a little bigger and I crochet much faster than I knit … Due mostly to the fact that I’ve been crocheting for a lot linger than I’ve been knitting.

I like both types of handmade socks, but I’d like to take the next few blog posts to talk about crochet socks.

There are a lot of people who didn’t know that you could crochet socks!  Many of the socks that you used to see crocheted were using worsted weight yarn and, while they made great house socks, didn’t fit in most shoes.  With today’s wonderful sock yarns, the socks fit!

Crocheting socks is a little different from knitting socks.  The way the fabric is created, and the properties of the fabric, are different so crocheters have to take that into consideration.  All of these statements are generalities and will vary with yarn and tools used.

  • Crochet is, in general, a little less stretchy than stockinette or ribbed knitting.
  • Crochet stitches are generally larger than knit stitches, so the bumps created by the stitches are further apart and more noticeable.
  • Crochet cables are, in general, thicker than knit cables
  • Crochet stitches are, in general, larger and thicker than knit stitches (slip stitch crochet is the most obvious exception)

Understanding these differences is key to making a good crochet sock!

The “less stretchy” factor can be addressed by adjusting the number of stitches in your sock.  You can still get a snug fit that’s not stretched too tight.  The noticeable bumps can be a good thing if you like them, or can be avoided by using a number of different stitches that minimize the “bumpy feel”.  Linked double and half-double crochet stitches are my favorite smooth stitches. Karen Whooley uses the extended single crochet, others use single crochet or slip stitch.  The thickness of the stitches is great if you want warm cushy socks made with sport weight yarn, or you can use some of the thinner fingering weight yarn and make lovely socks that you can put in your shoes!

If you are a crocheter and have never tried socks, I highly recommend them!  Crochet socks are becoming more and more popular, and patterns are getting easier to get.  Check out Karen’s books, and the free crochet socks on Ravelry!

Here’s some of my favorite patterns and pattern books for crochet socks:

Happy Crocheting!

Socks!


I’ve been on a sock making kick lately. Hand made socks are so comfy! I like both crochet and knit socks. The crochet socks are often a little thicker, but are also more squishy! Knit socks are thinner and smoother.

The multicolored socks at the top photo are made with left over yarn from socks that I made for my Father. They are a simple pattern that I made up using a basic toe-up formula.

My new green crochet socks are the Witchy Woman from “More crochet socks”. I love the lace pattern! I ended up making a sideways crochet ribbed cuff instead of the simple flat cuff that is in the pattern.

I’m so inspired by all these great sock patterns that I’m thinking about publishing a few of my own! Maybe one day 🙂

Socks!


I’ve been on a sock making kick lately. Hand made socks are so comfy! I like both crochet and knit socks. The crochet socks are often a little thicker, but are also more squishy! Knit socks are thinner and smoother.

The multicolored socks at the top photo are made with left over yarn from socks that I made for my Father. They are a simple pattern that I made up using a basic toe-up formula.

My new green crochet socks are the Witchy Woman from “More crochet socks”. I love the lace pattern! I ended up making a sideways crochet ribbed cuff instead of the simple flat cuff that is in the pattern.

I’m so inspired by all these great sock patterns that I’m thinking about publishing a few of my own! Maybe one day 🙂